Blaue Blume

“Die vier Dänen entwerfen Elegien von einer Wärme und Weite, in die sich Menschen mit geschlossenen Augen fallen lassen können, ohne je den Boden zu erreichen.“ (Bedroomdisco) „Die variable, außergewöhnlich hohe Stimme von Sänger und Gitarrist Jonas Smith passt perfekt zum Gemisch aus Dream-Pop mit noisigen Klangelementen.“ (SoundMag)..
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“Die vier Dänen entwerfen Elegien von einer Wärme und Weite, in die sich Menschen mit geschlossenen Augen fallen lassen können, ohne je den Boden zu erreichen.“ (Bedroomdisco)

„Die variable, außergewöhnlich hohe Stimme von Sänger und Gitarrist Jonas Smith passt perfekt zum Gemisch aus Dream-Pop mit noisigen Klangelementen.“ (SoundMag)

"Facettenreiche, synthetische Klangschnipsel - dumpf, kratzig oder leicht schwebend umgarnen sie wirkungsvoll den sensibel klingenden Falsett-Gesang, um in die traurige Welt der Blauen Blume einzudringen. Fast alles Hektische und Laute wird aus der Musik der Dänen verbannt, der Name Blaue Blume wird seiner Bedeutung, dem Sinnbild der Romantik, völlig gerecht. Wer vor Lärm flüchten will, kann sich dem mystischen, zuckrigen Art-Pop des Quartetts bedenkenlos zuwenden, oder sich an einem verregneten Tag mit dem grauen Himmel verbünden." (SoundMag)

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Danish band Blaue Blume makes lovely dreamy pop music reminiscent of Sigur Ros, Jeff Buckley or The Pains of Being Pure at Heart. You can also hear bits of Cocteau Twins, but the band is mostly inspired by Morrissey and his love of pathos. Jonas Smith's voice is almost angelic, and the guitars feel like a warm blanket you can doze off under. "The Danish group’s latest single, “Lovable,” is another of these sonic marvels, blending dynamic synth lines with singer Jonas Holst Schmidt’s graceful vocal performance." (Paste Magazine) “Denmark's Blaue Blume create gorgeous Electropop.” (Pop Matters)..
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Danish band Blaue Blume makes lovely dreamy pop music reminiscent of Sigur Ros, Jeff Buckley or The Pains of Being Pure at Heart. You can also hear bits of Cocteau Twins, but the band is mostly inspired by Morrissey and his love of pathos. Jonas Smith's voice is almost angelic, and the guitars feel like a warm blanket you can doze off under.

"The Danish group’s latest single, “Lovable,” is another of these sonic marvels, blending dynamic synth lines with singer Jonas Holst Schmidt’s graceful vocal performance." (Paste Magazine)

“Denmark's Blaue Blume create gorgeous Electropop.” (Pop Matters)

“Having very attentively kept a keen ear on Copenhagen’s Blaue Blume, it’s completely apparent that their output is as considered as it is consistently spectacular. Time has audibly been put into this latest number, Lovable, and that has incontestably been well spent. How come I never make you proud?” Jonas Holst Schmidt reiteratively query, his voice quivering with almost lachrymal intensity, before the tension is released with a whole new palette of impressionistic synths and subtle drums. Eminently lovable themselves, that second record can’t come soon enough." (Dots and Dashes)

"We can’t wait for more new music coming from those three very talented guys, “Lovable” puts the bar really high." (Good Because Danish)

“It is evident that the group enjoys building melodies and harmonies that sweep our brains. The voices of Jonas Holst Schmidt are melancholic, rich in sensitivity and longing. In his lyrics, much emphasis on the differences we usually have when compared to all those around us.” (Be Yourself TV)

“The second single ‘Lovable’ displays enoesque soundscapes and synthwave inspired melodic lines seasoned with tasty percussive grooves. ‘Vanilla’, their latest single showcases the band songwriting talents with smooth transitions, spatial guitar rhythms and soothing atmospheres.“ (HipCrave)

„He’ll later pierce an increasingly febrile atmosphere with a solitary expletive, much like he did on Sobs’ Ebony. And, wracked with persistently relatable internal unrest, it proffers a few welcome moments’ respite in this increasingly unsettled existence.“ (DotsandDashes)

„Their poignant and ambitious latest album, Bell of Wool, explores themes of darkness and adventure.“ (Metal Magazine)

Danish dream-rock group Blaue Blume was born in the city of Kolding
in central Denmark in the late 2000s, when school-friends Søren Buhl
Lassen and Jonas Smith joined forces to make music together (their
current line-up is Lassen and Smith, plus Robert Jensen Buhl and Buster
Jensen). From the band’s earlier moments, the members recognised a
spark in each other, a sensation of something special that Søren saw
even from the first rehearsal: “I remember the experience when we just
went into the rehearsal space and counted the song off, and just played
it” he says. “I really remember that, because I really felt it, and it instantly
felt like this could be a band, even though we weren’t yet”.
Now a decade on from that moment, the feeling of something special
being there has spread from that rehearsal space to fans around Europe
and beyond, through two EPs and an album, as well as hundreds of live
shows. Blaue Blume aren’t a band for the cynical or snarky – instead,
they work in heartfelt, sweeping art-rock, lush, dramatic compositions
personified by vocalist Smith’s tender but tough, emotionally affecting
falsetto. And now they’re releasing what might be their most dark, but
most beautiful record to date, new album Bell Of Wool.
Bell Of Wool takes the band’s songwriting into new territory – though
they never felt compelled to stick to strict convention, on this album the
indie and pop sounds that marked their earlier work are far behind them.
Instead, Bell Of Wool is painted from a new set of sounds, a record of
subtle, discreet synth pieces. Straight from the opener “Swimmer”, the
record showcases the muted, restrained touches that define the album.
The song moves slowly and softly, Smith’s vocal unspooling over a composed
and cushioned soundscape of synths, a dreamworld of rich, lush
musical colour and emotion. The album showcases a more assured and
mature version of the band, comfortable forgoing the spectacular and
theatrical for a record that’s no less emotionally affecting and compelling
for its subtlety.
The album is also more experimental and ambitious in its adventures
than their previous work, with the band lifting the restraints of convention
from their work. Partially the new style is the result of changes in
their lives, with more work being done individually than together in the
rehearsal room: “Our lives have changed”, says Søren. “Once we lived
in a house together, and all we did was making music together. Now
we don’t have as much time, so we want to make music a little faster
and that made us look for another way to make it work and still feel
like us”. But it’s also due to a deliberate step into writing free of rules
and restrictions: “It’s definitely something we’ve moving towards, trying
to break from the traditional way of making a traditional pop song. We
talked about this while making Bell Of Wool, we had this picture of a song
consisting of just choruses, one chorus taking over from another with no
repetitions, a smash hit with 30 different choruses in three minutes. We
haven’t managed that yet, but things like that were in our mind when
making the songs. We had the idea of strong sections of the song only
occurring once – how would that make the listener feel? Would they want
to return to the song? It was ideas of creating songs that flowed in a
linear structure. It’s something we tried to achieve, and now we’re trying
to perfect it even more”, says Jonas.
In the background of Bell Of Wool, there’s a story of trauma and darkness.
The album was delayed while Smith went through a period of depression.
For that period, the future of the band was uncertain – Bell Of
Wool, already almost completed, lay of the shelf while the band’s future
was in doubt. But in the end, the band started because of their bond and
determination, and their sense of shared purpose in making music, that
they even had back in Kolding: “What made us different was that we had
a desire to bring this band mentality, to be something bigger than just
rehearsing. We wanted music to be something bigger than just people
playing together. And I feel that is still the essence of our group, it’s not
just music, it’s also something sacred”, says Jonas. That unity pulled
them through in the end, and ensured Blaue Blume had a future. “I always
loved it”, says Søren. “I always loved playing music and playing with
these guys. It’s been a huge part of my life, and all of a sudden I thought
this was maybe being taken away. So I’m happy to do this again”.
And they’re back again with a new sense of purpose. “For a while It had
turned a bit into something we did because we felt we had to”, says
Jonas. “We were a bit lost in our goals, in a way. Now we’re back in the
rehearsal space, and I find myself finding the right goals again. Which is
being with these people I care about, who have been such a huge part of
my whole life. And it’s so special to stand there and feel that symbiosis,
and not even thinking about it having to have a commercial purpose.
We’ve stopped thinking about having to play this stage, or having so
many streams or whatever. Now it’s for our sake again. I was sure I was
never going to play music again, something I’d done my whole life. When
I felt this dark thing in me, and my body collapsed around it, I totally gave
up on music. Of course, it grew naturally within me again, wanting to
do music, and now I feel I’m doing it for the right reasons, with the right
guys. Mentally, we’re back to where and why we started”.
With their spirits renewed, and their crystalline, beautifully-crafted new
album Bell Of Wool ready to go, Blaue Blume are once again a band
ready to take on the world.

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